The Lords Prayer, Our Father

Lords Prayer

Jesus teaching about the Lord's PrayerThe Lords Prayer: Jesus “was praying at a certain place, and when he ceased, one of his disciples said to him, ‘Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.'” In response to this request the Lord entrusts to his disciples and to his Church the fundamental Christian prayer. St. Luke presents a brief text of five petitions, while St. Matthew gives a more developed version of seven petitions. The liturgical tradition of the Church has retained.

The Lord’s Prayer is one of the best loved and most spoken prayers on the planet. At easter sunday 2007, it is thought that over 2 billion people worldwide recited this prayer. It is used in church services, schools, in small groups and in many individual private times with God.

There are numerous different versions of the prayer. The traditional Lords Prayer is based on the Authorised Version of the scriptures in 1611. Other versions in common use are from the New English Version (adopted by the Church of England in 1977), and the Catholic version of the “Our Father” (in latin here ). The Lord’s prayer differs in length – the Catholic Church omits the doxology at the end (“For thine is the kingdom, the power, etc). All these popular versions base the text on Matthew 6:9-11, rather than as it appears in Luke 11:2-4.

 

St. Matthew’s text:

The Lords Prayer

Our Father, who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy Name,
thy kingdom come,
thy will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those
who trespass against us.

And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

For thine is the kingdom,
and the power, and the glory, Forever. Amen

The Context of the Lord’s prayer

The context for the prayer is the Sermon on the Mount, and Jesus discussing how we should pray. We are not to pray to impress God or others, or to think that we might be able to manipulate Him in order to get what we want.(Matthew 6:5-7, The Message) Rather, we are to come simply, as a child would to his father, and honestly, being real about our failures and need of God.

Some christians see the prayer as a model for how we should pray, rather than a definitive set of words that we should recite. This view is especially common in modern day evangelical and charismatic churches, where there is an emphasis on praying spontaneously from the heart. However, in other church traditions, such as the anglican and orthodox church, daily ritual in prayer is seen to be important in keeping close to God. There is also seen to be benefit from praying the same words together, as this helps unity of heart in worship.

The Church of The Lord’s Prayer

Below is a Picture of The Church of the Pater Noster (The Church of The Lord’s Prayer) is a Roman Catholic church located on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem. The 19th-century cloister is of European style and contains plaques that bear the Lord’s Prayer in over 100 different languages.

The Church of the Pater Noster is a Roman Catholic church located on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem.

Below is one of the tile panels of the lord’s Prayer in Greek. They also have the Lord’s Prayer set in tile panels in over  100 different languages from the Church of the Pater Noster is a Roman Catholic church located on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem. It is part of a Carmelite monastery’, also known as the Sanctuary of the Eleona.

Tile panel of the Lords Prayer in Greek

About The Lord’s Prayer

The Lord’s Prayer is one of the best loved and most spoken prayers on the planet. At easter sunday 2007, it is thought that over 2 billion people worldwide recited this prayer. It is used in church services, schools, in small groups and in many individual private times with God.

There are numerous different versions of the prayer. The traditional Lords Prayer is based on the Authorised Version of the scriptures in 1611. Other versions in common use are from the New English Version (adopted by the Church of England in 1977), and the Catholic version of the “Our Father” (in latin here ). The Lord’s prayer differs in length – the Catholic Church omits the doxology at the end (“For thine is the kingdom, the power, etc). All these popular versions base the text on Matthew 6:9-11, rather than as it appears in Luke 11:2-4.

Lords prayer written in aramaic

The Lords Prayer (also called the Our Father or Pater Noster, among other names) is a venerated Christian prayer that, according to the New Testament, Jesus taught as the way to pray.

Two versions of this prayer are recorded: a longer form in the Gospel of Matthew in the middle of the Sermon on the Mount, and a shorter form in the Gospel of Luke when ‘one of his disciples said to him, “Lord, teach us to pray, as John [the Baptist] taught his disciples.” The Sermon on the Mount

Man Praying at sun riseThe Lords Prayer – Our Father – Be Encouraged and Strengthened!

In Matthew 6:9-13 and in Luke 11:2-4 we read of Jesus teaching his disciples how they should pray. This popular Scripture is known as The Lord’s Prayer, and some know it by Our Father Prayer. Below you can read through and memorize the Lord’s Prayer as it was the example Jesus used when asked how we should pray. Remember though that it is a teaching tool not a magical saying that can influence God differently than any other prayer from our hearts.

 

Lords Prayer in Matthew 6:9-13 – “This, then, is how you should pray:

holding a bible

Matthew 6:9-13 – “This, then, is how you should pray: ” ‘Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us today our daily bread. And forgive us our debts as we also have forgiven our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.

The Matthew account includes more words at the beginning and end, and concludes with the additional “deliver us from evil” and some manuscripts “For yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory, forever. really.”

Lords Prayer in Luke 11:2–4 (NRSV)

Luke 11:2-4 – “He said to them, “When you pray, say: ” ‘Father, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come. Give us each day our daily bread. Forgive us our sins, for we also forgive everyone who sins against us. And lead us not into temptation.’ ”

What is the Lord’s prayer and should we pray it?

Reading about Faith, Open Bible while holding Tea Cup

Answer: The Lord’s Prayer is a prayer the Lord Jesus taught His disciples in Matthew 6:9-13 and Luke 11:2-4. Matthew 6:9-13 says, “This, then, is how you should pray: ‘Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come, your will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us today our daily bread. Forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.’“ Many people misunderstand the Lord’s Prayer to be a prayer we are supposed to recite word for word. Some people treat the Lord’s Prayer as a magic formula, as if the words themselves have some specific power or influence with God.

The Bible teaches the opposite. God is far more interested in our hearts when we pray than He is in our words. “But when you pray, go into your room, close the door and pray to your Father, who is unseen. Then your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you. And when you pray, do not use vain repetitions as the heathen do. For they think that they will be heard for their many words” (Matthew 6:6-7). In prayer, we are to pour out our hearts to God (Philippians 4:6-7), not simply recite memorized words to God.

The Lord’s Prayer should be understood as an example, a pattern, of how to pray. It gives us the “ingredients” that should go into prayer. Here is how it breaks down. “Our Father in heaven” is teaching us whom to address our prayers to—the Father. “Hallowed be your name” is telling us to worship God, and to praise Him for who He is. The phrase “your kingdom come, your will be done on earth as it is in heaven” is a reminder to us that we are to pray for God’s plan in our lives and the world, not our own plan. We are to pray for God’s will to be done, not for our desires. We are encouraged to ask God for the things we need in “give us today our daily bread.” “Forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors” reminds us to confess our sins to God and to turn from them, and also to forgive others as God has forgiven us. The conclusion of the Lord’s Prayer, “And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one” is a plea for help in achieving victory over sin and a request for protection from the attacks of the devil.

So, again, the Lord’s Prayer is not a prayer we are to memorize and recite back to God. It is only an example of how we should be praying. Is there anything wrong with memorizing the Lord’s Prayer? Of course not! Is there anything wrong with praying the Lord’s Prayer back to God? Not if your heart is in it and you truly mean the words you say. Remember, in prayer, God is far more interested in our communicating with Him and speaking from our hearts than He is in the specific words we use. Philippians 4:6-7 declares, “Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.”

Underscoring the foundation and true importance of the Lord’s Prayer, initial words on the topic from both Christian and Catholic Church’s teach that it “is truly the summary of the whole gospel. The prayer is used by most Christian churches in their worship; with exceptions, the liturgical form is the Matthean. Although theological differences and various modes of worship divide Christians, according to Fuller Seminary professor Clayton Schmit, “there is a sense of solidarity in knowing that Christians around the globe are praying together … and these words always unite us.

 

What does the Lords Prayer Mean?

A short line-by-line analysis. Click on the title links for more in-depth commentary.

• Our Father which art in Heaven

Jesus teaches His disciples that God is our parent in Heaven. The Apostle Paul restates this by exhorting the believer to address God as “Abba” (Aramaic for “Daddy”- the kind of intimate word that a child would use to his or her father) ” And by him we cry, “Abba, Father.”” (Rom 8:15, NIV)

• Hallowed be thy name

The first of seven requests in this prayer. “Hallowed” means holy. As we pray this line we are reminding ourselves that God is separate from us, completely pure and faultless. Here we become aware of our own frailty as we adore and worship the living God.

• Thy kingdom come

God’s kingdom is to do with His ways and order. So here we are asking that God’s ways happen here, as they are fully obeyed in Heaven.

• Thy will be done

The third request in this prayer is that God’s will occurs. Here we are aligning our will with God’s will, we are submitting ourselves to Him, and asking that His way triumphs.

• Give us this day our daily bread

We need God in all areas of our life (physical, spiritual and mental), and this is a daily need. We need to come back to God regularly, each day- indeed, many times each day and many ways, for we can quickly become independent and self-seeking. Jesus reiterates this daily dependency when he exhorts us to not “worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself” (Math 6:34, NIV)

• And forgive us our trespasses

Different versions of this prayer use different words here – sometimes “trespasses”, “debts” or “sins” (click here for a explanation of this). Here we bring to mind the ways in which we have failed God and others, and ask the Lord for His forgiveness.

• As we forgive them that trespass against us

As we receive God’s forgiveness, we bring to mind anyone who we feel may have wronged us, and pardon them.

• And lead us not into temptation

The sixth request in the Lord’s prayer is not to be in a place where temptation might overwhelm us. It is not wrong to be tempted or tested (Jesus was!). It is wrong to give in to this temptation.

• But deliver us from evil

The final request is for protection by our Father in heaven. When Jesus was tempted by Satan, he declared ‘Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.'(Math 4:4 NIV). In times of trial, Jesus recognizes the Lord as His source of deliverance. Likewise we are to depend on God when evil is at our door.

• For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory. Forever and ever. Amen.

The prayer finishes with a closing doxology, that is, a hymn of praise to God. Not all versions of the Lord’s prayer include this as many biblical scholars believe that this was added at a later date.

 

Lady teaching and pointing at a chalk boardThere are 6 steps of prayer that Jesus teaches us in the example of the Lords Prayer.

1. Address God’s rightful place as the Father

2. Worship and praise God for who He is and all that He has done

3. Acknowledge that it is God’s will and plans are in control and not our own

4. Ask God for the things that we need

5. Confess our sins and repent

6. Request protection and help in overcoming sin and satan’s attacks on us

As you read this Scripture, let it soak into your heart and begin to talk to God honestly and openly. He created you, loves you, and wants to hear from you! Use the Lords Prayer as a a way to walk through communicating with God and make it your own!

Step by step Analysis of the 9 Parts of  the lord’s Prayer

Introduction:    “Our Father, which art in heaven”

First Petition:     “Hallowed be thy Name;”

Second Petition:     “Thy kingdom come;”

Third Petition:     “Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven:”

Fourth Petition:     “Give us this day our daily (epiousios) bread;”

Fifth Petition:     “And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that trespass against us;”

Sixth Petition:     “And lead us not into temptation, ”

Seventh Petition:     “But deliver us from evil:”

Doxology:     “For thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, For ever and ever. Amen.”

Introduction

“Our Father, which art in heaven”

This explains that God, the Father, rests in Heaven, and the plural word “Our” indicates that there are a group of God’s children who call him Father.

Augustine interpreted “heaven” (coelum, sky) in this context as meaning “in the hearts of the righteous, as it were in His holy temple”.

First Petition

“Hallowed be thy Name;”

See also: Names of God in Christianity and Matthew 6:9
Former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams explains this phrase as a petition that people may look upon God’s name as holy, as something that inspires awe and reverence, and that they may not trivialize it by making God a tool for their purposes, to “put other people down, or as a sort of magic to make themselves feel safe”. He sums up the meaning of the phrase by saying: “Understand what you’re talking about when you’re talking about God, this is serious, this is the most wonderful and frightening reality that we could imagine, more wonderful and frightening than we can imagine.”

Second Petition

“Thy kingdom come;”

See also: Matthew 6:10
“This petition has its parallel in the Jewish prayer, ‘May he establish his Kingdom during your life and during your days.’ In the gospels Jesus speaks frequently of God’s kingdom, but never defines the concept: “He assumed this was a concept so familiar that it did not require definition.” Concerning how Jesus’ audience in the gospels would have understood him, G. E. Ladd turns to the concept’s Hebrew Biblical background: “The Hebrew word malkuth  refers first to a reign, dominion, or rule and only secondarily to the realm over which a reign is exercised.  When malkuth is used of God, it almost always refers to his authority or to his rule as the heavenly King.” This petition looks to the perfect establishment of God’s rule in the world in the future, an act of God resulting in the eschatological order of the new age.

The request for God’s kingdom to come is commonly interpreted at the most literal level: as a reference to the belief, common at the time, that a Messiah figure would bring about a kingdom of God.Traditionally, the coming of God’s kingdom is seen as a divine gift to be prayed for, not a human achievement.[citation needed] This idea is frequently challenged by groups who believe that the Kingdom will come by the hands of those faithful who work for a better world. These believe that Jesus’ commands to feed the hungry and clothe the needy are the kingdom to which he was referring.

Hilda C. Graef notes that the operative Greek word, basileia, means both kingdom and kingship (i.e., reign, dominion, governing, etc.), but that the English word kingdom loses this double meaning. Kingship adds a psychological meaning to the petition: one is also praying for the condition of soul where one follows God’s will.

Third Petition

“Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven:”

See also: Matthew 6:10
John Ortberg interprets this phrase as follows: “Many people think our job is to get my afterlife destination taken care of, then tread water till we all get ejected and God comes back and torches this place. But Jesus never told anybody—neither his disciples nor us—to pray, ‘Get me out of here so I can go up there.’ His prayer was, ‘Make up there come down here.’ Make things down here run the way they do up there.” The request that “thy will be done” is God’s invitation to “join him in making things down here the way they are up there.”

Fourth Petition

“Give us this day our daily (epiousios) bread;”

See also: Matthew 6:11 See also: Epiousios
As mentioned earlier in this article, the original word ἐπιούσιος (epiousios), commonly characterized as daily, is unique to the Lord’s Prayer in all of ancient Greek literature. The word is almost a hapax legomenon, occurring only in Luke and Matthew’s versions of the Lord’s Prayer, and nowhere else in any other extant Greek texts. While epiousios is often substituted by the word “daily, ” all other New Testament translations from the Greek into “daily” otherwise reference hemeran (ἡμέραν, “the day”), which does not appear in this usage.

Via linguistic parsing, Jerome translated “ἐπιούσιον” (epiousios) as “supersubstantialem” in the Gospel of Matthew, but chose “cotidianum” (“daily”) in the Gospel of Luke. This wide-ranging difference with respect to meaning of epiousios is discussed in detail in the current Catechism of the Catholic Church by way of an inclusive approach toward tradition as well as a literal one for meaning: “Taken in a temporal sense, this word is a pedagogical repetition of “this day, ” to confirm us in trust “without reservation.” Taken in the qualitative sense, it signifies what is necessary for life, and more broadly every good thing sufficient for subsistence. Taken literally (epi-ousios: “super-essential”), it refers directly to the Bread of Life, the Body of Christ, the “medicine of immortality, ” without which we have no life within us.”

Epiousios is translated as supersubstantialem in the Vulgate (Matthew 6:11) and accordingly as supersubstantial in the Douay-Rheims Bible (Matthew 6:11).

Barclay M. Newman’s A Concise Greek-English Dictionary of the New Testament, published in a revised edition in 2010 by the United Bible Societies has the following entry:

ἐπι|ούσιος, ον (εἰμί) of doubtful meaning, for today; for the coming day; necessary for existence It thus derives the word from the preposition ἐπί (epi) and the verb εἰμί (eimi), from the latter of which are derived words such as οὐσία (ousia), the range of whose meanings is indicated in A Greek-English Lexicon.

Fifth Petition

“And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that trespass against us;”

See also: Matthew 6:12
Twenty-one out of 23 bible versions available at BibleHub.com use the word “debts” and “debtors”, while none of the bible translations uses the word “trespass.” The Presbyterian and other Reformed churches tend to use the rendering “forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors”. Roman Catholics, Anglicans and Methodists are more likely to say “trespasses … those who trespass against us”. The “debts” form appears in the first English translation of the Bible, by John Wycliffe in 1395 (Wycliffe spelling “dettis”). The “trespasses” version appears in the 1526 translation by William Tyndale (Tyndale spelling “treaspases”). In 1549 the first Book of Common Prayer in English used a version of the prayer with “trespasses”. This became the “official” version used in Anglican congregations.

After the request for bread, Matthew and Luke diverge slightly. Matthew continues with a request for debts to be forgiven in the same manner as people have forgiven those who have debts against them. Luke, on the other hand, makes a similar request about sins being forgiven in the manner of debts being forgiven between people. The word “debts” (ὀφειλήματα) does not necessarily mean financial obligations, as shown by the use of the verbal form of the same word (ὀφείλετε) in passages such as Romans 13:8. The Aramaic word ḥôbâ can mean “debt” or “sin”. This difference between Luke’s and Matthew’s wording could be explained by the original form of the prayer having been in Aramaic. The generally accepted interpretation is thus that the request is for forgiveness of sin, not of supposed loans granted by God. Asking for forgiveness from God was a staple of Jewish prayers. It was also considered proper for individuals to be forgiving of others, so the sentiment expressed in the prayer would have been a common one of the time.

Anthony C. Deane, Canon of Worcester Cathedral, suggests that the choice of the word “ὀφειλήματα” (debts), rather than “ἁμαρτίας” (sins), indicates a reference to failures to use opportunities of doing good. He links this with the parable of the sheep and the goats (also in Matthew’s Gospel), in which the grounds for condemnation are not wrongdoing in the ordinary sense but failure to do right, missing opportunities for showing love to others.[Matt. 25:31–46]

“As we forgive…”. Divergence between Matthew’s “debts” and Luke’s “sins” is relatively trivial compared to the impact of the second half of this statement. The verses immediately following the Lord’s Prayer, [Matt. 6:14–15] show Jesus teaching that the forgiveness of our sin/debt (by God) is contingent on how we forgive others. Later, Matthew elaborates with Jesus’ parable of the unforgiving servant.[Matt. 18:23–35] In this parable, forgiveness from the king (God) is conditional on the servant’s forgiveness of a small debt owed to him.

Sixth Petition

“And lead us not into temptation, “

See also: Matthew 6:13
Interpretations of the penultimate petition of the prayer—not to be led by God into peirasmos—vary considerably. The range of meanings of the Greek word “πειρασμός” (peirasmos) is illustrated in The New Testament Greek Lexicon. In different contexts it can mean temptation, testing, trial, experiment. Although the traditional English translation uses the word “temptation” and Carl Jung saw God as actually leading people astray,  Christians generally interpret the petition as not contradicting James 1:13–14: “Let no one say when he is tempted, ‘I am being tempted by God’, for God cannot be tempted with evil, and he himself tempts no one. But each person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own desire.” Some see the petition as an eschatological appeal against unfavourable Last Judgment, a theory supported by the use of the word “peirasmos” in this sense in Revelation 3:10. Others see it as a plea against hard tests described elsewhere in scripture, such as those of Job. It is also read as: “Do not let us be led (by ourselves, by others, by Satan) into temptations”. Since it follows shortly after a plea for daily bread (i.e., material sustenance), it is also seen as referring to not being caught up in the material pleasures given. A similar phrase appears in Matthew 26:41 and Luke 22:40 in connection with the prayer of Jesus in Gethsemane. Joseph Smith, the founder of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in a translation of the Holy Bible that wasn’t completed before his death, used this wording: “And suffer us not to be led into temptation”

Seventh Petition

“But deliver us from evil:”

See also: Matthew 6:13
Translations and scholars are divided over whether the final word here refers to “evil” in general or “the evil one” (the devil) in particular. In the original Greek, as well as in the Latin translation, the word could be either of neuter (evil in general) or masculine (the evil one) gender. Matthew’s version of the prayer appears in the Sermon on the Mount, in earlier parts of which the term is used to refer to general evil. Later parts of Matthew refer to the devil when discussing similar issues. However, the devil is never referred to as the evil one in any known Aramaic sources. While John Calvin accepted the vagueness of the term’s meaning, he considered that there is little real difference between the two interpretations, and that therefore the question is of no real consequence. Similar phrases are found in John 17:15 and 2 Thessalonians 3:3.

Doxology

“For thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, For ever and ever. Amen.”

See also: Matthew 6:13
The doxology of the prayer is not contained in Luke’s version, nor is it present in the earliest manuscripts of Matthew,  representative of the Alexandrian text, although it is present in the manuscripts representative of the Byzantine text. Most scholars do not consider it part of the original text of Matthew. New translations generally omit it.

The first known use of the doxology, in a less lengthy form (“for yours is the power and the glory forever”),  as a conclusion for the Lord’s Prayer (in a version slightly different from that of Matthew) is in the Didache, 8:2. It has similarities with 1 Chronicles—”Yours, O LORD, is the greatness and the power and the glory and the victory and the majesty, for all that is in the heavens and in the earth is yours. Yours is the kingdom, O LORD, and you are exalted as head above all.” In the Byzantine Rite, a similar doxology is sung within the context of the Divine Liturgy. Following the last line of the prayer, the priest sings “For thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory, of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, now and ever and unto ages of ages.”

Latin Church Roman Catholics, as well as some Lutherans,  do not include the doxology when reciting the Lord’s Prayer; but it was added as an independent item, not as part of the Lord’s Prayer, in the Roman Rite Mass of 1970. The Anglican Book of Common Prayer sometimes gives the Lord’s Prayer with the doxology, sometimes without. Most Protestants append it to the Lord’s Prayer.

Relation to Jewish Prayer

There are similarities between the Lord’s Prayer and both biblical and post-biblical material in Jewish prayer especially Kiddushin 81a (Babylonian). “Hallowed be thy name” is reflected in the Kaddish. “Lead us not into sin” is echoed in the “morning blessings” of Jewish prayer. A blessing said by some Jewish communities after the evening Shema includes a phrase quite similar to the opening of the Lord’s Prayer: “Our God in heaven, hallow thy name, and establish thy kingdom forever, and rule over us for ever and ever. Amen.” There are parallels also in 1 Chronicles 29:10–18.

Rabbi Aron Mendes Chumaceiro has said[64] that nearly all the elements of the prayer have counterparts in the Jewish Bible and Deuterocanonical books: the first part in Isaiah 63:15–16 (“Look down from heaven and see, from your holy and beautiful habitation … For you are our Father …”) and Ezekiel 36:23 (“I will vindicate the holiness of my great name …”) and Ezekiel 38:23 (“I will show my greatness and my holiness and make myself known in the eyes of many nations …”), the second part in Obadiah 1:21 (“Saviours shall go up to Mount Zion to rule Mount Esau, and the kingdom shall be the LORD’s”) and 1 Samuel 3:18 (“… It is the LORD. Let him do what seems good to him”), the third part in Proverbs 30:8 (“… feed me with my apportioned bread”), the fourth part in Sirach 28:2 (“Forgive your neighbour the wrong he has done, and then your sins will be pardoned when you pray”). “Deliver us from evil” can be compared with Psalm 119:133 (“… let no iniquity get dominion over me.”). Chumaceiro says that, because the idea of God leading a human into temptation contradicts the righteousness and love of God, “Lead us not into temptation” has no counterpart in the Jewish Bible/Christian Old Testament.

The word “πειρασμός”, which is translated as “temptation”, could also be translated as “test” or “trial”, making evident the attitude of someone’s heart. Well-known examples in the Old Testament are God’s test of Abraham (Genesis 22:1), his “moving” (the Hebrew word means basically “to prick, as by weeds, thorns”) David to do (numbering Israel) what David later acknowledged as sin (2 Samuel 24:1–10; see also 1 Chronicles 21:1–7), and the Book of Job.

Bible Stories for Children About The Lord’s Prayer

Child Praying the Morning PrayerA children’s bible lesson about how God would like us to pray. Even Jesus’ closest friends, the disciples wanted to know how to pray. The disciples were with Jesus all the time and were with him when he went to pray and heard his prayers to God as well, yet they still weren’t sure how they were supposed to do it.

Before Jesus teaches the prayer he has a few things to say first. He says that we should keep our prayers simple. God listens to us no matter if our prayers are long or short and if you just don’t have the right words God knows what we mean (and we don’t need to use fancy words either)!

Jesus also mentions that we shouldn’t ‘show off’ when we pray. He said this to the people that used to stand on the street corners praying so that everyone would see how ‘great’ they were. God doesn’t want us to pray so people can see us or to hear how great we can pray. He wants us to pray in a quiet place with our own words our needs, thanks, praise, and what we’re sorry for.

This is how Jesus told us we should pray:

Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen.

This prayer might be a little tough to understand when you first hear it, but we’re going to go through it and try to explain what it means.

Our Father which art in heaven means we’re praying to our father who is in heaven. We start the prayer out this way so we know that we’re praying to God our father and we’re not alone. God likes it when we call him father and he wants us to talk to him like we talk to our own father. God is our loving father and we are his special children.

Hallowed be thy name is next and it means holy is your name. Even though God wants us to call him our father, he is still God. It’s sometimes really hard to understand who God is and what he’s like. How did he make us? How is he perfect and never makes mistakes? God just wants us to remember that we need to treat him super special because he is God and when we pray to him we need to be respectful.

Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. If we think about where God lives, we know its pretty great. The Bible says that in heaven there will be no more crying, God will live with us, and there will be no hunger or hurt there.

This part of the prayer says let your kingdom come. Let your will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. This means we are praying that people would live in peace and love with one another the way it is in heaven. It reminds us that we should be living the way God wants us to everyday.

Give us this day our daily bread means give us today all that we need. Keep in mind that these are things that we can’t live without. We don’t need video games and princess dolls those are the things that we want, we need food, water and shelter.

Even though we pray for things we need, that doesn’t mean we’ll get them. There are still people with no food in many parts of the world but that doesn’t mean we stop praying for these things. When we ask God for things that means we trust Him and we’ll leave the decision to God.

And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. This next part of the prayer is asking for forgiveness for our mistakes. Forgiveness means that we are sorry for something we’ve done and we don’t want to do it anymore. But we also need to forgive people who have done wrong to us. Sometimes others hurt us very badly, so we need to ask God to help us forgive them because it’s really hard or we don’t want to. If we forgive others, God will forgive us.

And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Is it sometimes tempting to do something you’re not supposed to? This part of the prayer is really neat because it asks God to help us to know the right thing to do. To protect us against the evil that is in the world and keep us away from it.

For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen. The last part of the prayer is the best part! For yours is the kingdom means that Heaven will last forever and will always be God’s. God also has all the power and all the glory FOREVER! It makes me happy knowing that God will never die and he’s the strongest and greatest. With God we will always win!

Anyone can read the Lord’s prayer, so it’s important to think about what you’re saying. When you pray “give us this day your daily bread” think about all the things you have to be thankful for and how God has given you everything you need, or things you need to ask for or pray for others. When you pray “forgive us our debts” ask forgiveness for those things you did wrong.

Prayer is our special way of talking to God so remember to pray as many times as you can. God loves you and wants to know everything about you and how you’re doing.

bible studyBible Verses About Prayer

1 John 1:9 – If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness.

James 5:16 – Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective.

Psalm 145:18 – The Lord is near to all who call on him, to all who call on him in truth.

Proverbs 15:29 – The Lord is far from the wicked, but he hears the prayer of the righteous.

Romans 8:26 – In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us through our wordless groans.

Philippians 4:6-7 – Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

27 Bible Verses about
The Lord’s Prayer

Matthew 6:9
“Pray, then, in this way: ‘Our Father who is in heaven, Hallowed be Your name.

Luke 11:2
And He said to them, “When you pray, say: ‘Father, hallowed be Your name. Your kingdom come.

Matthew 7:21
“Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven will enter.

Matthew 16:17
And Jesus said to him, “Blessed are you, Simon Barjona, because flesh and blood did not reveal this to you, but My Father who is in heaven.

Luke 10:21
At that very time He rejoiced greatly in the Holy Spirit, and said, “I praise You, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that You have hidden these things from the wise and intelligent and have revealed them to infants. Yes, Father, for this way was well-pleasing in Your sight.

Ephesians 3:14-15
For this reason I bow my knees before the Father, from whom every family in heaven and on earth derives its name,

Matthew 6:10
‘Your kingdom come Your will be done, On earth as it is in heaven.

Matthew 12:50
“For whoever does the will of My Father who is in heaven, he is My brother and sister and mother.”

Matthew 26:39
And He went a little beyond them, and fell on His face and prayed, saying, “My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me; yet not as I will, but as You will.”

Acts 21:14
And since he would not be persuaded, we fell silent, remarking, “The will of the Lord be done!”

Colossians 1:9
For this reason also, since the day we heard of it, we have not ceased to pray for you and to ask that you may be filled with the knowledge of His will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding,

Hebrews 10:9
then He said, “BEHOLD, I HAVE COME TO DO YOUR WILL.” He takes away the first in order to establish the second.

Matthew 6:11
‘Give us this day our daily bread.

Luke 11:3
‘Give us each day our daily bread.

Matthew 6:31-32
“Do not worry then, saying, ‘What will we eat?’ or ‘What will we drink?’ or ‘What will we wear for clothing?’ “For the Gentiles eagerly seek all these things; for your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things.

Matthew 7:9-11
“Or what man is there among you who, when his son asks for a loaf, will give him a stone? “Or if he asks for a fish, he will not give him a snake, will he? “If you then, being evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father who is in heaven give what is good to those who ask Him!

Matthew 6:12
‘And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors.

Luke 11:4
‘And forgive us our sins, For we ourselves also forgive everyone who is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation.'”

Matthew 6:14-15
“For if you forgive others for their transgressions, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. “But if you do not forgive others, then your Father will not forgive your transgressions.

Matthew 18:23-35
“For this reason the kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who wished to settle accounts with his slaves. “When he had begun to settle them, one who owed him ten thousand talents was brought to him. “But since he did not have the means to repay, his lord commanded him to be sold, along with his wife and children and all that he had, and repayment to be made. read more.

Mark 11:25
“Whenever you stand praying, forgive, if you have anything against anyone, so that your Father who is in heaven will also forgive you your transgressions.

Luke 23:34
But Jesus was saying, “Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing ” And they cast lots, dividing up His garments among themselves.

Colossians 3:13
bearing with one another, and forgiving each other, whoever has a complaint against anyone; just as the Lord forgave you, so also should you.

1 John 1:9
If we confess our sins, He is faithful and righteous to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Matthew 6:13
‘And do not lead us into temptation, but deliver us from evil. [For Yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever. Amen.]’

2 Corinthians 1:10-11
who delivered us from so great a peril of death, and will deliver us, He on whom we have set our hope. And He will yet deliver us, you also joining in helping us through your prayers, so that thanks may be given by many persons on our behalf for the favor bestowed on us through the prayers of many.

Revelation 3:10
‘Because you have kept the word of My perseverance, I also will keep you from the hour of testing, that hour which is about to come upon the whole world, to test those who dwell on the earth.

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